Archive for the 'style' Category

17
May
12

Hood-winked?

From the Sydney Morning Herald:

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21
Jan
12

Should Magazines And Modelling Be Banned For Kids Under 18?

(From The Huffington Post Canada    First Posted: January 20, 2012 12:10 PM )

Magazine covers seem to be getting sexier. And while the models gracing the pages are seemingly showing more and more skin, they also seem to be getting younger. Kaia Gerber, daughter of supermodel Cindy Crawford and Rande Gerber is the latest baby-face to land a modelling gig, becoming the new face of Young Versace — the Italian brand’s label for kids.

And though Crawford seems nothing but thrilled her little doppelganger is making her modelling debut at the tender age of 10, the whole thing has us wondering whether the modelling world should put an age restriction on how young is too young to model.

We’ve seen Thylane Blondeau pose seductively for French Vogue, Prada uses underage models in a 80-second promotional video and 17-year-old Dakota Fanning grace the cover of Cosmopolitan magazine (looking oddly airbrushed). Though Bonnie Fuller, former editor-in-chief of the girly magazine, is urging prudes to get their  “knickers out of knots” others, are calling on the fashion industry to be cautious about what they expose children to.

Former fashion model Nicole Weider, has started a petition calling for fashion mags, specifically Cosmo, to be packaged in a non-transparent cover and to only be sold to girls over 18. According to The Daily Mail UK, Weider believes, “This magazine has the devil written all over it… and is just a vessel for that.”

Model Coco Rocha, who herself was discovered at age 14, believes young girls aren’t prepared to be treated as adults and are being instructed to act in a way they’re normally not used to.

Whether you think Weider or Rocha’s take is prudish, it’s becoming clear sexualized images and exploitation of young girls is not only having negative consequences on the children who pose for millionaire designers, but also for the children who see the ads.

So what do you think: Should magazines be banned to kids under 18 and should teen girls stop modelling for big-time designers? Or is it all a matter of parents setting firm boundaries on what their children view, buy or read?


11
Dec
11

Time For A New Coat?


When was the last time you took a good, long look at your everyday coat? Does it fit you properly? Does it fit over bulky clothing? Does it fit your lifestyle? For many women, the answer is “no.”

What does your coat say about you? That you mean business regardless of the weather? Or that outerwear is an afterthought?  If a new coat is on your wish list this Christmas, think only of three things: purpose, lifestyle, and budget.

PURPOSE

What will the coat be used for? Work? Taxiing kids in cold weather? Skiing? If you begin with the purpose in mind, you’ll have a lot better success in finding what you need.

Long wool coats work well over dresses and business attire, for example, but hip-length coats are better if you’re constantly in and out of the car. Ski coats need to be warm and waterproof while dirty work coats need to be easily washed. Think about what you’ll be doing to find the best coat for the job.

             

LIFESTYLE

How many coats do you need? It depends on your lifestyle. For most people, one dress coat and one casual coat fits most of their needs. But if you live in a climate with four distinct seasons or if you attend a lot of different activities (work, sporting events, and charity balls) your outerwear wardrobe increases.  Also, if you travel a lot, different climates call for different coat weights. Bottom line: build your outerwear wardrobe based on your lifestyle needs and you will always be appropriately dressed.

BUDGET

Coats can be expensive, and you may not be able to afford all the different coats you’d like to have to fill out your outerwear wardrobe. That’s okay. Look at your primary needs first, then set a goal to fill in as your budget allows.  What is the most versatile coat that offers the biggest bang for your money? A classic trench with a zip out liner. It can handle cold, rain, casual, or business with equal finesse, and it folds up nicely for compact storage. But remember! Buy your coat in the best quality you can possibly afford – it will last longer and look better!

23
Nov
11

Fur or No Fur?

It’s long been one of the furriest fashion centers in the world – but not anymore. The West Hollywood City Council is banning the sale of clothing made of animal fur; it’s believed to be the first such ban in the U.S.  CBS Los Angeles reports that the vote on Monday was the final step in prohibiting the sale of clothing made from the skins or pelts of animals with hair, fur, or wool, within city limits.

NBC LA reports the council, in a 3-1 vote, adopted the law that goes into effect in Sept. 2013.

Shannon Keith, animal rights attorney and co-organizer of Fur Free West Hollywood, told a local radio station that it’s the right move.

“Animals suffer immensely for the use of fur,” she said. “Animals are skinned alive, they’re beaten, they’re stomped on, they’re gassed…it’s a horrible thing all in the name of vanity.”

The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), praised West Hollywood, calling it “just the latest compassionate action for the city.”

Councilman John D’Amico first introduced the ban in May, and afterwards the Fur Information Council of America released a study showing that out of 209 clothing stores in the city, 91 of them carried clothing or accessories made with animal fur.

The board of the “Avenues: Art, Fashion and Design District” claims the ban will limit the city’s reputation for creative expression in high fashion. The West Hollywood Chamber of Commerce opposed the ban as well.  (CBS Los Angeles)

What do YOU think?

04
Nov
11

Rain Boots Do’s and Dont’s

Unless you live somewhere sunny and warm, November equates rain! Here are some tips on how to wear those stylish rain boots….

  • Avoid wearing your rain boots on a non-rainy day.
  • If you plan to meet friends for lunch and hit the shops, gumboots are not the thing to be wearing (unless, of course, you trudged through a forest amidst a torrential downpour).
  • If you’re headed for a walk along the beach with a latte in hand, please, wear the rain boots!
  • Rubber boots are meant to keep your feet dry while appearing fashionably put together.
  • Don’t choose  the ‘boots with bare legs’ look – it never looks right.
  • Don’t wear your rubber boots at the office! Please!
  • Jeans or thick leggings (paired with a long, roomy top!) are the best combination to wear with your rubber boots.
  • Make the distinction between function and fashion. While we often let fashion win over function, the rain boot requires that you be fashionably functional.
  • Choose a red or colourfully printed pair, have fun and stay dry!
28
Oct
11

From Forbes: Dear Youth In The Office

10 Iconic Leaders Offer Hard-Knock Lessons 

We’ve been spending quite a bit of time with young people lately as they transition from the world of academics to the world of work and beyond. This seemed like some timely advice to share courtesy of Forbes.

Be True To Your Vision

“Listen to other people whose opinions you respect, but in the end, it has to come from you,” said Vogue Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour. “You can’t really worry too much by looking to the left or to the right about what the competition might be doing or what other people in your field might be doing. It has to be a true vision.”

Stay Interested

“Learn who you really are to become a whole person,” said Oscar-winning actress Jane Fonda. “It takes a lot of courage because all of the culture is telling us we’re supposed to be this way or that way. Try to be authentic; try to discover it. And stay interested. That’s much more important than being interesting.”

Get Clarity

“I see every challenge as an opportunity….My experience is a network, yours is whatever is calling you right now,” said media mogul Oprah Winfrey on Facebook, soon after appointing herself CEO of her cable network. “Get clarity. Don’t allow yourself to be overwhelmed. Don’t be defeated by mistakes. Learn from them. We have a new motto… ‘The next right decision’…What is it?”

Be Bold

“When you’re young, you just don’t know what you don’t know,” said KeyCorp’s Beth Mooney, the first female CEO of top-20 U.S. bank, on demanding her first banker job. “I never thought twice about the fact that if I could get in the door, they would let me in. I’m a person who sees the world in terms of possibilities and opportunities. I dive right in; get it done. Always be part of the solution.”

If New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson could give her younger self advice it would be: “You can take it. You can take on a lot of responsibility. Twenty-five years ago I had two very small children under the age of three, and that seemed overwhelming at times. I didn’t know whether I was up to it. [But] my kids turned out to be the most delightful people [although] I found it daunting.”

Stay Open To Possibilities

“Follow your beliefs. Be open to learn. Never give up,” said Michelle Bachelet, the executive director of UN Women and former president of Chile. “I’ve always been passionate, and I’ve always been involved in all kinds of initiatives. But [as a young girl] I never thought about being a president.”

Keep Believing

“Know this: Everything you dream of, that you care enough to not give up on, the deepest passions in you, the things you really want, will come true,” said Co-Anchor of NBC’s Today Ann Curry. “The things that I once thought were impossible, I now know were probable. In fact, for me, they’ve come true. There are so many things when you’re young, you think, ‘Could this ever happen?’ But if you don’t give up, if you love it enough, and if you work really hard, you will have it. It will happen. I know.”

Harness Your Unique Perspective

Saudi Arabian Princess Ameerah Al-Taweel, the 28-year-old businesswoman, philanthropist and wife of billionaire investor Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Alsaud, said on the youth advantage: “The people in a room with me may have more expertise, but nobody knows what I went through more than me. Nobody knows my community, my circle of friends and my generation more than me. Because I’m young and connected, I can connect with younger people and understand.”

Ask Questions, Then Listen

“The smartest thing you can ever do is to constantly ask questions, especially when you’re trying something new,” said Anne Sweeney, co-chair of Disney Media Networks and president of Disney/ABC Television group. “Find the people inside your team–who work for you, alongside you, and above you. Ask questions that matter. Listen. And constantly, constantly engage your team in communication. One of the things that I’ve seen kill careers is isolation.”

Overcome Internal Fears

“What is important is to first understand if you are able to overcome your internal limitations, you will be able to conquer any kind of goals you want to,” said Laura Chinchilla, the current and first female President of Costa Rica.

22
Oct
11

Make-up Makes Women Appear More Competent


Wearing makeup has a significant impact on how people perceive women, making women seem more attractive, competent, likable and trustworthy, according to new research published early this month.

According to ABC News, Researchers at Procter & Gamble, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute showed study participants photos of women either wearing no make-up or wearing one of three different cosmetic looks – natural, professional or glamorous.

In the first study, subjects were first shown images of women, who were of different ages and ethnicities, for 250 milliseconds. In a second study, a different set of study subjects looked at the same photos for an unlimited amount of time so they could carefully inspect each face.

Study participants then rated the women in terms of competence, likability, attractiveness and trustworthiness.

“We found that when faces were shown very quickly, all ratings went up with cosmetics in all different looks,” said Nancy Etcoff, lead author and associate researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital. “The women were judged as more competent, likable, attractive and trustworthy.”

But when subjects had the chance to examine photos for a longer period of time, the same perceptions didn’t carry over.

“When they got to the more dramatic makeup looks, people saw them as equally likable and much more attractive and competent, but less trustworthy,” Etcoff said. “Dramatic makeup was no longer an advantage compared to when people saw the photos very quickly.”

Etcoff said the study findings should serve as a message to women that cosmetics could have an impact on how people perceive them in ways beyond physical attractiveness.

“In situations where a perceiver is under a high cognitive load or under time pressure, he or she is more likely to rely on such automatic judgments for decision-making,” the authors wrote. “Facial images appear on ballots, job applications, web sites and dating sites.”

According to ABC News Radio, a Proctor & Gamble chemist and co-author on the study, Dr. Sarah Vickery, said the research could have an impact on the cosmetic industry.”We’re really seeing for the first time how that impacts how others perceive us so that could lead to new color palates, new finishes or it could impact how we organize our color collections for women,” she said.

This study shows that cosmetics enhance how others perceive your beauty, but there are other ways to feel beautiful,” said Ann Kearney-Cooke, director of the Cincinnati Psychotherapy Institute. “Your warmth, confidence and energy attract others to you. There’s nothing more attractive than a confident woman with a voice of her own, with her own style that comfortable in her own skin.”

(Excerpts from ABC News Article by Kim Carollo)